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Beet Borani

Beet Borani

Fill a saucepan with salted water and bring to a boil over high heat.

Add the beets, reduce the heat to medium, and cook the beets, uncovered, for about 30–35 minutes, until tender. Meanwhile, chop the greens.

Wash but do not dry them. Put the greens into a sauté pan and set over high heat.

Cover with a lid and steam in the water that remains on the leaves for 2– 3 minutes, until wilted.

Drain both the greens and beets and let cool for 20 minutes.

Stir together the yogurt, dill, oregano, and garlic and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Cut the beets into medium slices and add them to the greens.

Arrange them in a large bowl, alongside the yogurt dressing.

Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 3 hours.

Sprinkle with the pecans, and serve with naan.

Recipe courtesy of Vegan: The Cookbook by Jean-Christian Jury, Phaidon 2016, $49.95.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.


Don't chuck those beetroot tops

B eetroot grows with a bountiful plumage of nutritious, iron-rich leaves that taste and look similar to rainbow chard, which is from the same family. They’re usually thrown away, either at the farm or the market, but those stems and leaves are delicious cooked or raw. Try finely shredding the stalks into a coleslaw, and wilt the leaves and dress with olive oil and lemon, or whip up today’s quick beetroot leaf dip.

The leaves are usually removed because they perish quickly, which is good practice if the root needs to be stored for a long period of time: it helps prolong its life. However, if you do find beetroot with its greens attached, that’s a clear sign of freshness, because it means they were likely picked in the last few days, and are therefore tastier and more nutritious.

Keep the tops and roots at their freshest by removing the stalks and leaves when you get home and storing separately in a container in the fridge. Use the greens much as you would any other leafy vegetable.