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Mixing Energy Drinks and Alcohol Can Make You Think You’re More Drunk, Study Says

Mixing Energy Drinks and Alcohol Can Make You Think You’re More Drunk, Study Says



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The study looked into the effects of marketing on consumer’s drinking beliefs

The study tested a theory to see if the advertising of energy drinks can give a placebo effect.

According to a new study led by the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business, Red Bull may figuratively give you wings. Researchers found that simply telling someone that they’re drinking an alcoholic beverage mixed with an energy drink can make them feel super-drunk, even more so than they actually are.

In the study, researchers gathered 154 young men and gave them a cocktail with vodka, Red Bull, and fruit juice. Each cocktail was labeled either emphasizing the presence of the energy drink or not — e.g., “vodka-Red Bull cocktail, “vodka cocktail,” or “exotic cocktail.” Participants in the study were then asked to complete tasks on a computer screen to see how their perceived “drunkness,” attitudes, and behaviors changed.

Results showed that those who drank cocktails that openly labeled the presence of Red Bull “significantly increased” how drunk the participants thought they were, along with risk-taking, and self-confidence, especially among those who already believed mixing alcohol and energy drinks can make you more drunk.

“Given the study's findings about the psychological effects of energy-drink marketing, energy drink marketers should be banned from touting the disinhibiting effects of their ingredients,” Pierre Chandon, co-author of the study and marketing professor at the international business school INSEAD, said in a statement. “Regulations and codes of conduct should consider the psychological — and not just the physiological — effects of products.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”


Believing you’ve drunk an energy drink mixed with alcohol can increase levels of drunkenness according to new study

DON’T underestimate the power of your brain when it comes to boozing.

Because just believing you’re guzzling an energy drink can increase levels of drunkenness.

We usually blame our livers for our inebriation, but new research reveals that drunkenness is also in the mind.

The research shows the extent to which the mind impacts on drunkenness, in the same way as booze.

The Canadian study suggests that simply telling a young man he was consuming an energy drink as part of his alcoholic beverage was enough to make him feel more intoxicated, daring — and sexually self-confident.

It also proves the power of advertising, showing how men are conditioned to think certain alcohol-free drinks contain intoxicating qualities.

Most Read in Living

'Failed by system'

H2-uh-oh

The team at the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business recruited 154 men who were each given a cocktail of vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice.

One group were given drinks which were labelled as “vodka cocktail” or “exotic cocktail”.

The others received drinks with the label “vodka-Red Bull cocktail”.

The participants were then asked to complete a series of relatively simple tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness, and their attitudes and behaviours.

The study found that emphasising the presence of an energy drink significantly increased men’s perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence.

The effect was very strong among participants who had already believed that mixing energy drinks and booze would have this effect.

This is despite recent studies which found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol’s effect on behaviour.

The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found emphasising the energy drink decreased their intentions to drive under the influence.

The results, published in the Journal Consumer Psychology, show how strongly marketing can impact on consumer beliefs.

Lead author and assistant professorYann Cornil said: “Red Bull has uses the slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings,’ but our study shows this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn’t.

“When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel they’re more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way.”