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Best Restaurants in the Northeast

Best Restaurants in the Northeast



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Clio (Boston)

You can't talk about Boston's dining scene and not mention chef Ken Oringer. At this branch of his growing empire, he does French fine dining proud, but plays by his own rules, producing impeccable, artistic plates with a focus on market-driven ingredients — a fact that has not gone unnoticed by the critical powers that be (just count how many "Best of" lists this place has graced). Clio's downstairs offshoot, Uni, by the way, is a popular hangout for local chefs.

Frank Pepe Pizzeria (New Haven, Conn.)

Arthur Bovino

If you want to discuss the loaded topic of America's best pizza with any authority, you've got to make a pilgrmiage to thislegendary New Haven spot. What should you order at this checklist destination? Two words: clam pie. This is a Northeastern pizza genre unto its own, and Pepe's is the best of them all — freshly-shucked, briny littleneck clams, an intense dose of garlic, olive oil, oregano, and grated cheese atop a charcoal-colored crust. (Advanced move? Clam pie with bacon). Just expect to wait in line if you get there after 11:30 a.m. on a weekend.

O ya (Boston)

Innovative sushi and related new-Japanese fare (hamachi sashimi with banana pepper mousse, venison tataki with porcini cream) are prepared here with imagination and flair by an American chef and served in an understated dining room to the accompaniment of a large choice of excellent sake or wine.

Al Forno (Providence, R.I.)

Husband-and-wife owner-chefs George Germon and Johanne Killeen received the Insegna del Ristorante Italiano from the Italian government, a rare honor for Ameicans, attributable to their informed passion for pasta along with their invention of the grilled pizza. They also, though, aim the culinary spotlight on Rhode Island's defining vegetables — corn, squash, beans, and tomatoes — prepared simply, with the authentic Italian panache one would expect of multiple James Beard honorees.

Fore Street (Portland, Maine)

When chef Sam Hayward opened this brick-framed restaurant in 1996, nobody thought of Portland as a dining destination. He helped change that with his meticulous sourcing of fine local products and the menus that change daily based on what comes in. Wood-roasted mussels and grilled marinated hangar steak are among the items always available, but the seasonal treasures are always worth sampling.

Radius (Boston)

Chef and owner Michael Schlow has made a mark on Boston with his award-winning French-American food. Now a decade old, Radius still draws crowds looking for an urbane dining experience, from the lauded $19 burger to one of the rarefied five-course tasting menus.

Hungry Mother (Boston)

Combine a menu of seasonally driven dishes made with locally sourced ingredients with chef Barry Maiden’s classical French culinary training, add in his love of Southern comfort foods, and you have Hungry Mother. Husband and wife team Alon Munzer and Rachel Miller Munzer run the wine and liquor programs and front of the house, respectively, and they do it very well.

Neptune Oyster Bar (Boston)

Boston is known for its history, sense of tradition, and shellfish. That being known, it takes more than just any old seafood shack to keep Bostonians coming back for more. While the menu at Neptune Oyster Bar tends to lack in creativity, its greatness comes in the delivery of undeniably superb renditions of classic New England fare. Start with any of the 12 varieties of oysters from the bar, and follow-up with the clam chowder and lobster roll for the perfect meal.

L'Espalier (Boston)

One of the pioneers of modern haute cuisine in Boston, chef-owner Frank McClelland has received a host of awards at L’Espalier. (Among other things, it was the first New England restaurant to receive four stars from The Boston Globe, back in 1996.) The food served at L’Espalier is focused around local and seasonal ingredients, with particularly good seafood, and the seasonal tasting menus, at $105 and $185, are well worth trying.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.


Pining for the Peach State: Georgia’s Most Iconic Foods

Taste your way through the Empire State of the South with Georgia’s quintessential dishes — and the top places to sample them.

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: Eliot VanOtteren

Photo By: Lindsey Larue Photography

Photo By: Lauren Carnes Photography

Photo By: J. Monroe Studios

Georgia on Our Mind

When the 13th colony was founded in 1732, it was prized for its agricultural and geographic diversity, from Savannah&rsquos waterfront to the North Georgia mountains and everything in between. Out of that bounty has grown a rich and varied culinary tradition, so whether you&rsquore craving classic comfort food &mdash fried chicken, pimento cheese, barbecue &mdash or something a little more out-of-the-box, the perfect culinary match awaits in the Peach State.

Illustration by Hello Neighbor Designs

Peaches

Pimento Cheese

Boiled Peanuts

Vidalia Onions

Born out of a planting mistake in Vidalia, Georgia, during the Great Depression, the Vidalia onion has become the standard-bearer for sweet onions (according to the Vidalia Onion Committee, they represent 62 percent of sweet onion sales during their spring-to-summer season). Northeast of their namesake town, The Hil at Serenbe's Chef Hilary White offers Caramelized Vidalia Onion Dip, served with house-made potato chips. The onion's sweetness complements creamy sour cream and mayonnaise, with brandy, garlic and celery salt adding a seductive depth of flavor.

Barbecue

Meat & Three

Georgians love their meat-and-three restaurants, since they put the choice in the patron&rsquos hands. Guests choose one protein and three Southern side dishes. Macon&rsquos H & H Restaurant has been serving their friendly brand of Southern fare since 1959 (including, famously, to the Allman Brothers band before they were well-known). On any given day, you&rsquoll find meatloaf, fried catfish, country fried steak and smoked turkey on offer, though the fried chicken, made from a time-honored recipe, is by far the most popular meat. Pair it with your choice of sides including macaroni and cheese, fried okra, collard greens, squash casserole, green beans and more, and you&rsquoll have a stick-to-your-ribs meal.

Chicken & Dumplings

Few things south of the Mason-Dixon are as comforting as chicken and dumplings, with their luxurious broth, tender chicken meat, hearty vegetables and toothsome dumplings (some swear by dropped and boiled, while others favor rolled, noodle-like dough). At Atlanta&rsquos Watershed, Zeb Stevenson uses a time-honored recipe, keeping it simple with a mix of breast and thigh meat and airy white flour buttermilk dumplings suspended in rich, thick chicken broth, scented with fresh herbs and local vegetables. Served piping hot, it&rsquos a year-round favorite.

Pecan Pie

Fried Chicken

Just about everyone can agree that the perfect piece of fried chicken should be golden and crunchy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. Universal agreeability may stop there, as strong feelings exist on everything from seasoning, frying fat and starch for breading. At Food 101 in Sandy Springs, fried chicken has been a perennial menu favorite since the 1999 opening. The restaurant sources its chickens from family-owned Springer Mountain Farms (in Georgia's Blue Ridge Mountains) before dredging the breasts in the chef's own secret flour-and-seasoning recipe and deep frying them to golden perfection. The signature entree is served over whipped potatoes, with green beans, chicken gravy and coleslaw.

Fried Green Tomatoes

Georgia Wild Shrimp

Fried Apple Pies

Fried Okra

Blueberries

Fried Chicken Biscuit

Georgians love their fried chicken, and even first thing in the morning isn&rsquot too early to enjoy it. At Chef Hugh Acheson&rsquos Empire State South in Atlanta, the kitchen turns out a fried chicken biscuit of legendary proportions. Fluffy biscuits hold a juicy batter-fried breast (sourced from Grateful Pastures in nearby Mansfield) and a scrambled egg. For a sweet and savory flavor punch, he adds house-made bacon marmalade and pimento cheese. It&rsquos the kind of breakfast that lets you know you&rsquore in the South and can keep you energized for whatever the day brings.

Pralines

Coca-Cola

Deviled Eggs

Trout

Downtown Blue Ridge is a destination for recreational and competitive fly fishermen, so it&rsquos fitting that area restaurants offers some quality local trout. Chester Brunnemeyer&rsquos in capitalizes on the mountain city&rsquos reputation as Georgia&rsquos trout capital with a standout version of smoked trout dip. It starts with hardwood-smoked local trout, which is flaked and folded into a deliciously creamy mixture of sour cream, cream cheese, lemon juice and zest, fresh dill and Dijon mustard. The appetizer is served cold alongside celery, carrots, flatbread and garlic Mediterranean crackers.